Welcome to PBN’s Type 1 Teen Topics!

Introducing TEEN TOPIC TUESDAY, where our Teen Advisory Panel of Teens With Diabetes (TWD), ages 13-19, will address your questions and concerns about Type 1 Diabetes from the viewpoint of a teenager. Each week our TWD Panel will focus on one topic, generated by them or by you, our readers. Some of the upcoming topics will include Nightscout, Trusting your Teen, and Athletics.  If you have a question or a topic to pose to our teens, please email it to us at ProjectBlueNovember@gmail.com.

TEEN TOPICS – WEEK #79: When did you start becoming interested in taking care of your own diabetes needs?  Which things did you take over first?  How much do you do now?

Annelies (age 15)
I think I’ve been fairly independent from the beginning. When I was diagnosed at age 6, my school didn’t have a school nurse and so I learned how to take care of myself more at an early age.

Andrew (age 15)
I became interested in taking care of my own diabetes needs after I started to realize the long-term implications diabetes will have on my life. After making that realization, around age 9, I started to take over simple things such as: testing my blood sugar, bolusing and making sure I have my supplies with me at all times. Starting my own care at a young age now lets me manage my diabetes individually (with the help of my parents and doctors when needed); I now test, bolus, do sets, reservoirs, lead doctor’s appointments, and do any other task you can think, of on my own.

Cameron (age 18)
When I was diagnosed in the second grade, my parents did everything for me. Throughout elementary school, I gradually started to count my carbs, inject myself with my insulin, and check my blood sugar by myself. Now, as a senior in high school, I pretty much do everything by myself. My parents will help with pre-filling my cartridge for my pump. Also, my mom handles all the insurance stuff of course. But other than that, I mostly do everything by myself.

Caroline (age 15)
I was diagnosed at 12 years old and I gave my first shot in the doctor’s office by myself. I wanted to do it all by myself and I wanted to be independent. The doctor had to force me to let my parents give me some shots so that they could have some practice in case I was ever not able to give them to myself, or I needed help. My parents and I always carb-counted together, ever since the beginning and even now, I have them check after me when I am not 100% sure of something.

Christina (age 15)
Since I was diagnosed at 13, my parents gave me a lot of the responsibility of taking care of my diabetes from the beginning. At first it was just testing and then giving my shots with their supervision. But now I test and change my sites and take care of everything on my own. I still go to them for guidance and moral support because this disease is a lot and you need support.

Claire (age 18)
I was diagnosed at age 7.  I’ve been completely independent for about 7 years now, ever since I got on pens, and now that I’m 18 and  I’m on my own, and have little to no input from my parents. It’s usually closer to none, though.

Erin (age 18)
I became interested when I was diagnosed at age 10, and have been independent since then in all of my cares. I have done everything since then on my own.

Haley (age 14)
I’ve always wanted to take care of myself. I was diagnosed as a baby.  I started checking my blood sugar on my own when I was around six years old, and I started giving my own shots around nine years old. I pretty much handle everything on my own now. But, I run my decisions by my parents and they do night time checks and give my morning Lantus.

Ian (age 15)
I started about a month after I was released from the hospital when I was 11, beginning with testing and then to shots etc. I do most of it now, but am still taking advice from my parents.

Jon (age 16)
I was diagnosed at age 7.  By age 8 I was more interested in doing my own finger checks and trying to learn about carb counting.  But when I was 11 was the time I really felt comfortable giving myself my own shots in 5th grade. The summer of 5th grade I went to Joslin Diabetes Camp and that is when I really started taking more of an interest in my self-management.  By middle school I was still going to the nurse during lunch and for treatments, but I was doing all of that by myself in the office.  When I went on a pump and a CGM in 7th grade, I took on a lot more responsibility. By high school I was no longer going to the nurse and no longer relaying numbers to my mom during lunch.  Today, in 10th grade, I do all of my self-management, with my mom checking in with me to review the CGM and Pump information to make any adjustments together on the weekends.

Jordan (age 19)
I’ve always been interested in doing my own stuff for diabetes. I first started with testing myself when I was diagnosed at age 9, then I moved to counting carbs. I’ve always been good at guessing carbs. I started doing my own shots (and then the pen) within a few weeks.  By 7th grade I only had to visit the nurse if I was having a stubborn low or high.  After that I started changing my own sites, but I liked it when my mom helped me.  In high school when I was 15 I had a lot of burn out, so my parents helped me a lot for a while. Now I am away at college and do everything for myself besides dealing with insurance.

Julia (age 15)
I started taking care of all my diabetes when I got home from the hospital at diagnosis at age 11. My mom and dad gave me one shot at the hospital and since then I’ve done everything else. My parents monitor me but I am independent when it comes to physically dealing with diabetes.

Laura (age 18)
I was interested in taking care of myself from the beginning when I was diagnosed at age 11. I did my own shots, checked my blood sugar, etc. My mom helped me for a while when I first started on the pump and also with the Dexcom. Another thing she helped me with was counting carbs. Now I do everything on my own. She does check in with me time to time, though.

Lexi (age 16)
I was diagnosed when I was  11.  Well, when you get older you start wanting to do things on your own. Diabetes is one of them.


Maggie (age 17)
I think I was about 7 when I was diagnosed, and around  8 I did my shots for a while and then I did my pump. I am almost completely independent except for when I’m in a rush or too lazy to fill my pump.

McKenna (age 16)
Well since the day I was diagnosed I’ve always been interested in doing it myself. I do everything myself unless my blood sugar is too low for me to function.

Skylyn (age 17)
I would say that I have always been at least a little interested in taking care of my own diabetes needs since I was diagnosed at age 8. I first learned how to count carbs and test my blood sugar. Now, I can do most of my diabetes needs. I still get help with set changes and temp basals, but otherwise I try to do it myself.

Vanessa (age 16)
I became interested in it just about the same time I was diagnosed when I was 5. I wanted to know why I needed to check my blood all the time and why I needed a shot every time I would eat anything.   I started doing my own shots before anything. I liked feeling independent.   I do it all now, but of course mom still reminds me to check or ask if I’ve done my shots when she sees me eating something. lol I don’t think I’ll ever deal with my diabetes alone, it’ll always be my mom & I.

**To see all of the previous topics, please visit our archive at https://pbntype1teens.wordpress.com **

TEEN TOPICS – WEEK #78: Is it better to be open about, or hide your diabetes?

Annelies (age 15)

I think that it’s better to be open about your diabetes. It’s a part of you, and it’s not going away, so why hide it?

Andrew (age 15)
I find it better to be open about your diabetes, that’s how I am personally, and that’s because it allows you to be more open in general. If you are constantly worrying about hiding your diabetes it can take a toll on you emotionally. In addition to the negative effects of hiding your diabetes, being open about your diabetes also makes people around you more comfortable with your diabetes which can make you feel more confident.

Cameron (age 18)
I think it depends on how you feel about it personally. It’s not a bad thing to be open or quiet about your diabetes. It all depends on how you view it. Personally, I’m open about it, but I think that’s mostly because I’m an extrovert (which means I’m outgoing).


Caroline (age 15)
I think it is much better to be open about your diabetes. For a long time, I didn’t want anyone to know that I had Type 1 and that made it really hard for me, looking back on it. I was always having to go to the bathroom to check my sugar or going behind something in the nurse’s office to give myself a shot because I didn’t want anyone else to know. I feel like it is harder on you to hide your diabetes, and I think you shouldn’t care what other people think about you because everybody is different, special and unique in their own way. Sometime, diabetes happens to be the way that you are different than others.


Christina (age 15)
From my diabetic journey, I have come to realize it is so much better to be open about your diabetes. It took me a long time to learn this, but it feels so much better when you feel you don’t have to hide a part of yourself from people at school. Now, I can nonchalantly share that I have diabetes without being embarrassed and freaked out that I will be judged. Instead I take a second to educate someone and feel better that I can do what I have to do to take care of myself and not have to hide it.

Claire (age 18)
It’s ALWAYS better to be open. Yes, it can be embarrassing to talk about, and even frustrating when you get the repetitive, “Oh, so you can’t have sugar?” Or the, “Wow, you must’ve eaten too much sugar as a kid.” Or from the really gutsy people who say, “Oh, well you’re not THAT fat.” Yes, it can be annoying to even bring it up, but as far as your overall health goes, it’s better if as many people around you know what’s going on and what to do in case of an emergency.

Erin (age 18)
I think it depends on the situation but I think overall, it’s better to be open in case something happens such as super low/high blood sugars.

Haley (age 14)
It’s probably best to be open about diabetes. I think if I started trying to hide it, I would just create more stress for myself. Also, if people know about it I have more opportunities to educate them about the disease and if I ever needed help they would know what to do.

Ian (age 15)
It is best to stay private. You eliminate the possibility of discrimination, and you can truly say “I don’t want sympathy” without being hypocritical.

Jon (age 16)
In my opinion it is better to always be open about having type 1.  There is really no reason to hide that you experience life in a unique way where you have to monitor your blood sugars.  It is also good for others to know in case of an emergency.  I have found most people to be very understanding and nice about the fact I explained what I’m doing when I stop to check my number or treat and the reason I need to.

Jordan (age 19)
I think it’s better to be open, because it’s better for your safety, and it lets people know the responsibility they have to help you if you are having a problem. I also don’t think it’s anything to be ashamed of, so why would I hide?

Julia (age 15)
I think it’s better to be open about diabetes. That way if I need help with something people will know what to do.

Laura (age 18)
I guess it just depends on the person. I’m mostly open about it, if need be, but if I’m in a situation in where it’s not needed information, I just keep it to myself. The best option of the two, of course, would to be open. That way if there happened to be an emergency people would be prepared.

Lexi (age 16)
I feel it’s best to be open about it. I like explaining it to people and getting their reactions.

Maggie (age 17)
I am open with my diabetes. I don’t hide it at all and I teach everyone how to take care of me in case there is an emergency.

McKenna (age 16)
It is always best to be open about your diabetes.

Skylyn (age 17)
Having diabetes for over 9 years, I can say that I have done both. When I was younger, in elementary school, I mostly hid my diabetes. I didn’t want people to know and thought they would treat me different if they knew about my diabetes. Now, I don’t really care and I let people know soon after meeting them that I have diabetes. I have learned that most people don’t really care either. I haven’t ever been treated badly or anything because of my diabetes.

Vanessa (age 16)
I’ve always been really open about it. I would tell my friends and everyone around me that I had diabetes, and if they had questions I was more than happy to answer them and educate them. I hate how so many people are uneducated about the disease and think they know what it is off of the same “if you eat too much sugar you’ll be a diabetic” saying that people have always said. I feel like the more I open up about it and tell people, the more people learn. That makes me feel good knowing I’m educating people about it.

 

TEEN TOPICS – WEEK 76:  Have you ever done any babysitting?  If so, did you tell the parents that you have T1?  If you haven’t done any babysitting, do you think that parents need to know if their babysitter has T1?

Annelies (age 15)
I believe the parents have a right to know, so they know just in case something happens. It’s important for someone of authority to know so if an emergency happens, they know why or what to do.

Andrew (age 15)
Personally, I have never babysat, but I do think it is important to ensure the parents of the child be fully aware of what your diabetes means and how capable you are of handling your diabetes. As long as you tell the parents you’re diabetic, the possible complications of diabetes (so they know what they’re getting into), and you ensure them you’re capable of taking care of your diabetes, you should be fine.


Cameron (age 18)
I have never babysat, but I do think it is important to tell someone if you have T1. They need to know who they are leaving their kids in the hands of. I mean if I had my kids with a babysitter and came home to find a syringe in the trash can, I wouldn’t be too happy. This is why they should know if you have T1 if you’re babysitting.


Caroline (age 15)
I babysit a lot. It took me some time to work up some courage to be comfortable with watching other children that weren’t my siblings and making sure that my blood sugar was in range so that I had the maximum ability to make the best decisions possible for the care of the children. I try to make sure my blood sugar is as stable as possible when I’m babysitting so I can make the best decisions. I always talk to the parents before they leave and let them know that I have Type 1 diabetes. I explain what that is, what it means for me, and what my methods of care are while I am babysitting. If the children are old enough, I always show them where my low supplies are so that they know if something were to happen.


Christina (age 15)
No, I haven’t done any babysitting yet. I do believe that the parents you are babysitting for need to know you have diabetes just so they are aware in case of emergency. However, it doesn’t need to be a big deal; you can just say, “I just want to let you know I have T1D. But I am fully capable of taking care of myself and should have no problems. But I just would like to be upfront with you about it.” It’s better for them to know in case you have a hypo and you pass out and they walk in.

Claire (age 18)
I have done a lot of babysitting, and it’s courtesy to let the parents know of your, possibly, life threatening illness, because they need to know and be able to decide whether they want to take you on as a babysitter. However, most parents aren’t rude and won’t hire a diabetic, they ask questions, and get to understand your situation better, at least from my experience. The great part though is when you get to babysit other diabetic kids, which I’ve done, and being able to help them with their stuff is so cool, and educational, because every kid has a different set up, system, and way to get insulin.

Erin (age 18)
I have babysat and the parents knew because I used to hang out/ play with the kids.

Haley (age 14)
The only babysitting I’ve done so far is for my siblings and cousins. If I were to babysit for someone outside of my family, I think they should be aware that I’m diabetic. I don’t think being T1D should prevent me from babysitting, but I would want them to at least know why I’m carrying syringes with me and doing injections or bg checks.

Ian (age 15)
I have only done cat sitting. However, I believe that the parents should only know if the babysitter would be unable to fulfill his/her duties.

Jordan (age 19)
I have babysat for the boy down the street, because he also has T1.  That is why his parents asked me to babysit.  If I babysat for someone else, I would definitely tell them that I have diabetes.  I think they have a right to know if the person charged with caring for the child has a medical condition that could affect their care.
Julia (age 15)
I haven’t done any babysitting but I would absolutely let the parents know about my diabetes.

Laura (age 18)

I have never babysat before, other than my nephews, but my whole family is aware that I have T1. I don’t think it’s the utmost importance that the parents know about T1. Unless the person babysitting feels as if they aren’t under stable control of their diabetes, I don’t really think it’s a big deal because they can just take care of themselves. It doesn’t hurt to let them know, though.

Lexi (age 16)
Most babysitting I’ve done is with my mom’s friend who knows I have diabetes and the kid was definitely able to understand this type of stuff so they both knew my issue and all that comes with it.

Maggie (age 17)
I have babysat before. The parents knew I was a diabetic and I babysit for a diabetic so I take care of him and myself. You should let the parent know that you’re t1d just in case of emergency.

Vanessa (age 16)
I have never, and if I have it’s been with another friend there and it wasn’t my job I was just helping my friend. I definitely think the parents should know, and I think they should also know if the person takes care of them self just so that they know there’s not a big chance of something bad happening to their babysitter while they’re gone and that the attention is on their kids.


**To see all of the previous topics, please visit our archive at https://pbntype1teens.wordpress.com **

TEEN TOPICS – WEEK 75:  How do you handle your diabetes and D supplies when doing active things, such as sports, beach days, skiing, etc…? 

Annelies (age 15)
With my blood sugar, I usually try to find out how to manage my IOB so I don’t drop during games or practice. I usually have someone watch my stuff or keep it close enough to be able to access it quickly. With treating, I think it depends. If I’m low I usually try to have juice nearby especially on hot days, and if I’m high, I have to be really careful with how much insulin I dose.

Andrew (age 15)
When playing sports, I always have a kit in both my sports bag and in the medical bag that our team takes to every game and practice. I also keep low supplies in my bag and the medical bag in case I need them. Whenever I’m doing an activity, I always test before the activity, at least once during the activity, and after to make sure my numbers stay in line. I do give myself a higher basal during sports to address my adrenaline rush and I drop the rates after to accompany the drop in blood sugar due to my activity.

Ashley (age 16)
I’ll check my blood sugar before I do an activity and see what I’m at and go from there. With my supplies I’ll normally take my pump off and keep my other things in a cooler.

Cameron (age 18)
I always put my supplies in a sling bag and brng that bag with me everywhere. I play tennis, so I keep my pump in my pocket like it usually is, and I keep my CGM in my tennis bag and will look at it occasionally.


Caroline (age 15)
When I am doing my activities such as marching band and beach days, I have an “Otter Box” that I put my CGM & PDM in. The “Otter Box” is sand proof, wind proof, water proof, etc & keeps my devices dry & cool. I keep these devices in the “Otter Box” & my low supplies, snacks, etc as well as my insulin in a cooler to keep it cool. I keep them safe by combining the “Otter Box” & the cooler in a specific bag that is labeled just for diabetes. When I need to test or treat I use the hand sanitizer that I have in my diabetes bag when I don’t have access to soap and water to wash my hands.


Christina (age 15)
As a cross country and track runner, taking care of my diabetes is super important. I rarely drop while I’m running but before practice, or a cross country race, I always put a little fruit snack pack in my sports bra, so I can grab them if I feel like I am dropping during a run. I do not carry any other supplies with me while I’m running, but for indoor season I carry my test kit with me to the sidelines in my spike bag. I usually test right before I start to warm up and if I’m too low for my liking I will have something small but if my sugar is fine I don’t test again until after my race. I’ve found that this works for me, but everyone is different, especially with how their sugars react to exercise.

Claire (age 18)
 I handle my diabetes just like I normally do, I keep my supplies as close as I can. However, considering I used to Rodeo and I horseback ride quite often, I can’t really keep all my supplies up on the horse with me, so I keep them either with my parents when I rodeo, or safe in the truck.  It’s typically the truck considering I’m 18 now and they have given me my space to be independent, which I greatly appreciate.

Erin (age 18)
I think it depends on the activity location and intensity of activity. For example, in the winter I keep my supplies inside somewhere out of the cold while sledding but if I feel low I go in to check. Last summer I went to the beach and just kept my supplies in and a bag in the shade because it was cooler than leaving in a car. The only sport I can say what it’s like with is volleyball, and I was allowed to keep my bag near me off the court and wear Med id. I played less than others because I went low a lot during practices. As for where to keep supplies safe,that in the end is just judging the situation you’ll be in ahead of time. Always put your diabetes first and check when you feel unwell and treat with what you have on you or find a way to get food that you need to treat near your activity you are involved in.

Haley (age 14)
Whenever I’m playing sports it’s not that big of a deal for me to handle my diabetes and supplies. I always do a bg check before I get started and determine if I need a snack to keep me from going low. I keep my supplies in my backpack on the sidelines, and there’s always someone who knows where it is in case of an emergency. Going to the beach is a little trickier for me if my parents aren’t around (if they are, they keep up with my stuff). If I’m only going to be on the beach for an hour or two I keep my meter and something for lows in a small insulated bag inside a drawstring backpack. I make sure to do bg checks more frequently when I’m out swimming.

Ian (age 15)
The only thing that I do if that sort is bicycling, and when I do that, I attach it to my luggage rack. When I dance, I keep my bag in the studio and keep my pump on and tucked away. If I need to decrease basal, instead of stopping to adjust, I quickly and discretely unplug my pump from the site, and plug it back in when I no longer don’t need it.

Jordan (age 19)
Before I exercise I make sure my number is not too low – and if it’s close to low I’ll eat a snack uncovered.  I always make sure I have extra juice or Gatorade on hand in case I go low.  I take my pump off and put it in my backpack with my other supplies and try to set it somewhere out of the sun.

Julia (age 15)
I always keep my diabetes supplies on the bench while playing sports and our manager always carries them with her when we move. I wear a pouch around my stomach and keep my pump in that during games.

Laura (age 18)
Whenever I’m out and about doing “active things” I do the same thing as I would any other time. I carry my supplies in a backpack or something, and I keep it with me at all times. Sometimes I change what I carry based off what I’ll be doing. (i.e. extra snacks/juice if I’m doing heavy exertion.) I test/treat as needed.


Lexi (age 16)
If I’m ever on a big trip that lasts longer than 3 days and I’m hours away or something I make sure I pack extras just in case. With sports I bring a poweraid and take sips out of it every so often to keep my sugars from dropping.


Maggie (age 17)
I always carry a bag with me with juice, a meter, and sites. Depending on the activity I may take my pump off and put it in my bag. Sometimes I may go on shots if I know my sites won’t stay in. I usually test every 2 hours if I’m doing large amount of activity like swimming and I’ll correct if I feel like I’m dropping or if I know I’m dropping. I’ll also check to make sure I’m not going too high. If I do take off my pump and I’ll sit out and correct for that if it’s necessary.

McKenna (age 16)
I bring extra supplies when I’m doing active things. I keep my supplies in a little purse so it doesn’t bring a lot of attention. I keep the supplies safe by being careful with everything I do. I test and treat like usual but if it’s during a sporting event such as basketball I check during half time and give a unit if needed. Otherwise everything stays the same.

Skylyn (age 17)
On days when I’m going to be doing something active, I just kinda deal with the circumstances and do what I know. For example, if I’m going swimming at the lake or something, I’ll leave my pump and supplies with someone who isn’t swimming or I’ll leave it in the car in a bag on the floor out of the sun near something cold so it won’t overheat. If I feel low or anything, I’ll just go test and treat myself.

TEEN TOPICS – WEEK 74: Do you wear any sort of sensor/cgm (Dexcom or Enlite)?  Why or why not?  What do you like/dislike about it?  

Annelies (age 15)
I wear a Dexcom, and I like the security it gives me. The site hurts a little going in, but it’s worth it.

Andrew (age 15)
I do wear a cgm, an Enlite cgm to be exact, that is linked to my Medtronic 630g pump. I wear a cgm because it allows me to have a better understanding of my blood sugar spikes, lows, and other abnormalities that I can address and correct at a later date. I like wearing a cgm because of the accuracy it helps me achieve with my numbers and the information it constantly gives me about my numbers. I dislike my cgm because it adds another thing to my body that can be accidently tugged, pulled, or yanked.

Ashley C. (age 16)
I’ll wear my cgm dexcom randomly for like a month then take a break from it. I don’t like it because it’s just another site you have to wear and change out.  You also have to calibrate it every day so I’d rather just not wear it.

Cameron (age 18)
I wear a Dexcom because it’s nice to be able to see where my numbers are all the time. I like it because it shows when I’m going low/high.

Caroline (age 15)
I wear a Dexcom CGM. I chose to begin wearing a CGM because I became extremely unaware of my hypoglycemia and my doctor recommended getting a CGM in order to prevent having extreme lows. I really like the fact that I can always know my number because I can prick my finger less, and I can determine how to dose based on the situation I am in & what my sugar is at the moment. The only thing I dislike sometimes is the constant, constant reminders when I’m high. It can get annoying.

 Christina (age 15)
No, I don’t wear any type of sensor. I don’t want to wear a sensor at the moment because it is another device that would be attached to me. Also, I have a hard time changing my pump site on time every 3 days, so I can’t imagine having to worry about another site. Lastly, I can be a bit of a worrier and I don’t think having access to my blood sugars trends 24/7 would be good for me; I would constantly obsess over the graph. For me, it’s good to not be so connected to my blood sugars.

Claire (age 18)
I don’t wear one, no.  It’s not that I don’t like them, however I think that they’re better for little kids whose parents want to keep a closer eye on their kid’s numbers. I, on the other, have a good grasp on how I feel in relation to my blood sugar, and just don’t feel they’re necessary for older kids.

Erin (age 17)
I do not wear a cgm but have been interested in one at times. With the new Medtronic pump/CGM I would possibly be interested in getting it however I do remember not liking having a pump site when I was on a pump. I like how it tracks sugars and you can watch trends but do not like having to wear something that’s like a site on me 24/7 and then still checking with a meter.

Haley (age 14)
I am not currently wearing a cgm. I have worn one as a trial for a couple of weeks. But, while I like being able to see how my bg is trending, I don’t like having something attached to me all the time. Also, another downside is it’s another piece of equipment I have to keep up with.

Ian (age 15)
I wear the dexcom for the control and knowledge it gives me. I love the currentness of it, but the transmitter is far too bulky, especially with a belt on.

Jordan (age 18)
I wear the Enlite cgm periodically because it helps me monitor my BG.  I don’t like how much it beeps or alarms.  It annoys me.  It’s difficult to deal with because I can never seem to calibrate it properly, so it isn’t as accurate as it could be. It also always catches on everything. I’m not a fan.

Julia (age 15)
I wear a Dexcom. I wear it to help regulate my sugar to catch highs and lows quicker. I like it because it is very useful but it also can be a pain because it’s another thing attached to me.

Laura (age 17)
I wear the Dexcom. I really enjoy this because it makes it less of a hassle to handle my blood sugar. Not only that, but it makes me more comfortable falling asleep at night knowing that if I go low, an alarm will make me up. The only bad thing about the cgm is that it makes me lazy about testing my blood sugar.

Lexi (age 16)
I would love to but the extra site scares me, especially because I’ve seen what the needle looks like.

Maggie (age 16)
I wear a Dexcom. My mom likes to keep track of my numbers and I think it helps me keep an eye on if I’m going up or down. I think it’s helpful but I don’t like the constant alarming it can get annoying.

McKenna (age 16)
I wear a cgm and it has its ups and downs. Some perks are that I do not have to check my blood sugar as much, it’s usually very accurate, and it helps me keep my A1C in check. Some of the downsides are that sometimes it can be very noticeable, sometimes it can become very itchy or it can hurt when putting it in.

Skylyn (age 16)
I wear an Enlite sensor mainly because my stepmother makes me. I am not a fan of the sensors. She wants me to wear them all the time which I don’t think is necessary. I feel like the sensor would be beneficial before endo appointments so my doctor can have more info to look at but that’s about it. I also test myself like 6 times a day at least and during the night so I don’t see the point of the sensor. They affect what I wear whenever I go out places. They are not very accurate either.

TEEN TOPICS – WEEK 73: In regards to school dances (such as prom) or other fancy occasions – how do you handle dressing up with T1?  What do you do with your pump/cgm (if you wear one)?  How do you manage injections? Testing?

Annelies (age 15)

I usually have shorts under my dress, so if I need to bolus I can just get it. It’s usually not a big deal when it comes to testing and blousing.

Andrew (age 15)
As a freshman I’ve never been to prom, although I have been to homecoming, and from my experience managing your diabetes during those occasions doesn’t differentiate much from your normal care. If you test and bolus before the dance, maybe once during, and after you should be fine. When dressing for an occasion I wear my pump proudly on my waist and my cgm is covered by my clothing so I don’t change much for fancy occasions.

Ashley C. (age 16)
When I dress up for dances and have to wear a dress I wear nike pros (shorts) under it, so I’ll just hook my pump on to it. With my meter, I’ll just carry it around in my normal meter bag and if I have to test I’ll just go off to the side and test.

Cameron (age 18)
I just tuck my tubing under my clothes to where it’s comfortable enough to wear without being noticeable. I keep my pump and CGM in my pocket like I usually do. When I test, I just pull my meter out and do it because almost all of my friends know I have diabetes.


Caroline (age 15)
I wear an OmniPod & a Dexcom CGM, both of which are wireless, meaning nothing that has to be constantly clipped to me. I put my PDM for my OmniPod & my receiver for my Dexcom in my bag & I pull them out as needed for dosing decisions or to handle any issues. When I need to test my sugar, I just pull out my testing materials & test. Most people that I am with know I have Type 1 Diabetes & so there is no reason for me to hide my testing or dosing.


Christina (age 15)
Since being diagnosed I have been to a few dances where I have worn dresses. I like to wear my pump without its clip case in a pump pocket that my mom bought me online. The pocket discretely goes around my thigh and it keeps my pump secure and when I’m sitting down I don’t mind lifting my dress up a tiny bit to bolus. When I wear skirts I usually clip my pump to my waist or use the pump pocket. In regards to testing, I don’t like to carry a big “diabetes” bag with me to fancy occasions, so I use a Coach wristlets that fits my glucagon, test kit, low supplies, and a few other essentials. It’s the perfect size and keeps everything I need to test if I feel low from dancing or am about to eat.

Claire (age 18)
When I was in High School, for prom and other dances I would typically put my pens in a small clutch along with some needle tips and my blood checker. It wasn’t a really big deal, and I would just wear what I would normally wear, and when I inject I just pull my dress up a little bit, and when I check my blood I just prick my finger as normal.

Erin (age 17)
High school events it depended on what it was. If it was a game I went to watch I would carry the supplies on me to test and give injections if needed. For dances I would test whenever I felt I needed and grabbed my bag from the bag check in. Typically for prom/homecoming groups are beforehand so I would take insulin according to the meal and upcoming activity. Usually the dances had water and some sort of snack so I never had to worry much if I was high or low. I never had to think much where to put supplies as I always have a bag of some sort. For college now at events and games I just carry a bag like I did in high school.

Haley (age 14)
I don’t wear a pump or cgm, so I haven’t had to be concerned with what to do about them. I just keep my supplies off to the side (preferably where a chaperone can keep an eye on my bag) and if I need to do a check or injection I just find a spot to sit down where I can do it. I don’t have a problem with doing injections or checks in public, but I try to be discreet in case there’s someone who has a needle/blood phobia.

Ian (age 15)
I put my pump in my pocket and hide the tubing beneath my shirt and sports coat. I don’t check by blood, rather I rely on CGM for the night, which I check constantly on my pebble watch.  When it comes time to bolus, I do it through the fabric of my pants, using the audio-bolus feature.

Jordan (age 18)
It’s easy as a guy because we can clip our pumps to our waist the same as always, but with girls maybe try to find a dress with pockets to put your pump in.  I just test like normal, it’s nothing you should be embarrassed about doing.
Julia (age 15)
A friend made me a leg pouch to put my pump in so I can keep in on my leg under my dress. I just test my sugar when I need to like I usually do.

Laura (age 17)
I use omnipod which doesn’t have any tubing, so it’s very easy to dress up. I’m not really embarrassed of my pod or cgm or so I don’t go to any extra means to try to hide them. I usually have a side hand bag or something to carry my testing equipment in, and I just test as/bolus as needed.
Lexi (age 16)
I wear shorts like spandex under my dress, although I have to go into a bathroom stall or something because it’d be weird lifting up my dress to get to it in the middle of a dance. But that’s also why I love having a meter that syncs with my pump.

Maggie (age 16)
With school dances I’ll either try and find a dress with pockets and cut a hole in the pocket for my pump wire or I’ll wear a belly band. I usually don’t wear a cgm at dances but I do wear my pump. I’ll go into the bathroom to do insulin and I’ll test where ever I am.

McKenna (age 16)
For school dances I do not wear my cgm that night, I check my blood sugar before I eat, after I eat and in the middle of the dance when I need to get anything I go check my number really quickly. For injections, I always go to the bathroom, calculate my carbs and do my shot in my thigh because it’s easiest to access.

Skylyn (age 16)
I normally wear my pump in a pack that goes around my waist and at school dances, that doesn’t change. I don’t wear super tight dresses so you can’t really see my pump. I wear little shorts under my dresses so I’m all good when I have to bolus. And then for testing, I just keep my meter in my purse.

TEEN TOPICS – WEEK 71: If you had an issue related to your diabetes, would you feel comfortable enough to ask your diabetes team?  

Annelies (age 15)
Yes, I’d be comfortable. Your diabetes team should be a support system for you, and you shouldn’t be afraid to tell them if you’re having issues related to diabetes.

Andrew (age 15)
I would feel comfortable asking my diabetes team about an issue I have with my diabetes because I have an amazing team. I’ve had that same team since a young age and they’ve supported me through the entire diabetic experience with great advice and leadership. If I could give one piece of advice to parents about finding outside sources to help your child’s diabetes care, it’d be to find the right medical team.

Ashley C. (age 16)
Yes that’s the people I would ask because no one else would understand it.

Cameron (age 18)
Yes because they’ve always been here for me and supportive of me.

Caroline (age 15)
Yes, I would feel comfortable discussing it with my diabetes team. They are amazing & super supportive.

Christina (age 15)
If I had an issue with my diabetes I would feel most comfortable talking to my doctor rather than my educators. I have a great connection to my endocrinologist and she doesn’t yell at me because of how I take care of my diabetes. But, in an emergency I would talk to anyone from my team. I know I would feel a bit awkward asking for help. However, I have talked to my doctor over the phone during emergency calls when I needed my insulin adjusted because my parents thought it would be easier for me to change my pump settings if I was talking directly to the doctor.

Claire (age 18)
I would 100% feel comfortable because I know that the majority of them have gone through, if not the same thing as me, then similar things to me. And I’m always willing to hear others points of view in order to problem solve and find a solution that maybe I hadn’t previously thought of.

Erin (age 17)
Yes; I’ve had issues before and was not afraid to bring them up with my team.

Haley (age 14)
 Yes. I have an awesome and very supportive team, so I feel like I would be comfortable discussing any issues I might have.

Ian (age 15)
 Yes, however, I would only ask if I could find no answer that seemed purely legitimate and thoughtful elsewhere.

Jordan (age 18)
Yes, you should never feel embarrassed about your diabetes, it is literally a matter of life and death, so if there is an issue you should speak to your team.  Your team should make it a point to create a comfortable environment where all questions are okay to be asked.

Julia (age 15)
Yes, I would feel comfortable asking them for help.

Laura (age 17)
If there was ever a problem I wouldn’t be afraid to ask. I might be a little embarrassed afterwards but I always put my health first.

Lexi (age 16)
Yeah probably. Diabetes is a serious thing.

Maddy (age 15)
I would be very comfortable talking with my diabetes team if there was an issue. The job of my diabetes team is to help me when there are problems or miscommunications. I love my endo and she is always helping me with any problems I have, and helps me stay positive when something not so good happens.

Maggie (age 16)
I do feel comfortable asking my diabetes team if there ever was an issue. I have my doctor’s offices email in my phone just in case of emergency.

McKenna (age 16)
Yes, I would feel comfortable asking because the know more about it than I do. They’ve studied diabetes so, yes, I would feel comfortable.

Skylyn (age 16)
Yeah I think I would probably be comfortable asking my endocrinologist about an issue with my diabetes. If I wasn’t comfortable asking her, then I would probably ask other diabetics in one of the Facebook diabetes groups I am a part of and see if anyone on there has experienced the same thing and could offer advice.

Vanessa (age 16)
Yes, it’s always great to have others to give you advice about something you haven’t gone through yet but they have and it makes you feel better that someone else understands what you’re going through.