TEEN TOPIC #53: How do you feel about getting a new adult endocrinologist as you age out of pediatric ones? Are you nervous about it, or excited that you get to choose your own? 

Annelies (age 15)
I’m more sad than nervous. I like my endocrinologist, and it’s going to be hard to say goodbye to another endo. I’m not looking forward to having to do it by myself as an adult, I like having my parents in the room to answer all the questions I don’t know.

Erin (age 17)
I’m in a trial where every other appt since I was 16 I’ve met with an adult endo and I like them a lot better. Most of the time I don’t need to see anyone but my endo so it’s nice with an adult to not see the other people (social worker, PCA, and nutritionist). So overall I am excited and very much ready after this summer to switch.

Ian (age 14)
I am worried about it, because I fear that they’d be inferior or have entirely conflicting views to/than my current one.

Jessica (age 20)
I am not so much nervous for an adult endocrinologist as I am reluctant. I enjoy the practice and doctor I currently see. Therefore, I don’t want someone new. She knows me, how my body works and what works best for me. I don’t like the idea of having to start all over again with someone who hasn’t known me at all. I’ve lived with this disease for over 15 years so to change is going to be a bigger adjustment in life than most others would think. The one thing I would say that makes me nervous/worrisome is actually finding someone I like and can connect with; someone I can trust and look to for medical advice. I don’t want to be going to 5 new doctors until I find one that I like again. That can be a long, tedious and annoying process. Nonetheless, it has to be done and everything happens for a reason so I am sure I will find one that I enjoy when the time comes.

Jordan (age 18)
I don’t like that I am going to have to switch away from Dr. Daniels.  I am not nervous, but I am also not happy because Dr. Daniels is very supportive and has been a great endocrinologist. I worry that no one else will ever be like him.

Julia (age 15)
I haven’t really thought about getting a new endocrinologist but I’m not too nervous about it.  My parents will help me find a great one so I don’t think it’ll be too hard.

 

Laura (age 17)
I guess I’m sort of neutral about it. Some people get really excited about discovering new things about diabetes or being able to take control of their own illness, but either way I don’t really care and it doesn’t really affect me (as far as I can tell, at least). A doctor is a doctor regardless of what age I am.

 

Andrew (age 15)
I’m excited for the opportunity to select my own endocrinologist because it’s another step in becoming more independent and learning to live my life as an adult with diabetes.

 

Ashley B. (age 16)
I’m honestly kind of sad that I’ll have to get a new Endo, because my Endo is so understanding and supportive of me. We’ve known her almost 9 years now, so not being able to see her anymore will be a huge deal. I’m worried about choosing a new Endo because I honestly don’t even know what to look for in an Endo. Hopefully I’ll just get a recommendation from my current Endo or something for future reference.

Ashley C. (age 14)
I don’t think it will be much different because, my mom has allowed me to switch to different endocrinologists until I found one I clicked with.

Cameron (age 17)
I’m not too worried. I think getting to choose my own is pretty cool because it’s something new and I’m not forced to be with certain doctors.

Claire (age 18)
I’m sort of nervous to get a new Endo. My pediatric endocrinologist is, hopefully, going to hold onto me as I transition into adulthood. Fingers crossed he doesn’t get tired of me soon, or else I’ll definitely be anxious about having to “adult” as I go onto college.

Lexi (age 16)
It would be something to get used to, but I wouldn’t mind it. The one I have now is great, she’s fun and understanding.

Maggie (age 16)
I am kind of scared to find a new adult endocrinologist considering I’ve had the same one since diagnosis. I am also very excited to choose my own because I know that if I find one who is just as good as my current then I can continue to stay under control and meet new people and learn more things about myself that I never knew. It’s honestly terrifying to think about but in the long run it will be the best thing for me

Mercedes (age 17)
I am excited to go to an adult endo, mostly because of the change. Where I live there isn’t much of a choice of who I can go, to but it is still exciting to see the difference in people.

Nick (age 19)
If only I got to choose my own. Unfortunately, my insurance is limiting, and only covers one doctor near me. As for moving from a pediatric to an adult endocrinologist, I feel comfortable. I’m confident in my own knowledge as well as that of my doctors.

Skylyn (age 16)
I’m not really nervous or excited about getting a new endocrinologist as I become an adult. I have been going to the same pediatric one for about a year now and I think that she will probably recommend an endocrinologist for me to go to.

Vanessa (age 16)
I am excited because I feel like they will understand better than the pediatric endocrinologist, since they deal with older patients.

 

TEEN TOPIC #53: How do you feel about getting a new adult endocrinologist as you age out of pediatric ones? Are you nervous about it, or excited that you get to choose your own? 

 

Annelies (age 15)
I’m more sad than nervous. I like my endocrinologist, and it’s going to be hard to say goodbye to another endo. I’m not looking forward to having to do it by myself as an adult, I like having my parents in the room to answer all the questions I don’t know.

Erin (age 17)
I’m in a trial where every other appt since I was 16 I’ve met with an adult endo and I like them a lot better. Most of the time I don’t need to see anyone but my endo so it’s nice with an adult to not see the other people (social worker, PCA, and nutritionist). So overall I am excited and very much ready after this summer to switch.

Ian (age 14)
I am worried about it, because I fear that they’d be inferior or have entirely conflicting views to/than my current one.

Jessica (age 20)
I am not so much nervous for an adult endocrinologist as I am reluctant. I enjoy the practice and doctor I currently see. Therefore, I don’t want someone new. She knows me, how my body works and what works best for me. I don’t like the idea of having to start all over again with someone who hasn’t known me at all. I’ve lived with this disease for over 15 years so to change is going to be a bigger adjustment in life than most others would think. The one thing I would say that makes me nervous/worrisome is actually finding someone I like and can connect with; someone I can trust and look to for medical advice. I don’t want to be going to 5 new doctors until I find one that I like again. That can be a long, tedious and annoying process. Nonetheless, it has to be done and everything happens for a reason so I am sure I will find one that I enjoy when the time comes.

Jordan (age 18)
I don’t like that I am going to have to switch away from Dr. Daniels.  I am not nervous, but I am also not happy because Dr. Daniels is very supportive and has been a great endocrinologist. I worry that no one else will ever be like him.

Julia (age 15)
I haven’t really thought about getting a new endocrinologist but I’m not too nervous about it.  My parents will help me find a great one so I don’t think it’ll be too hard.

Laura (age 17)
I guess I’m sort of neutral about it. Some people get really excited about discovering new things about diabetes or being able to take control of their own illness, but either way I don’t really care and it doesn’t really affect me (as far as I can tell, at least). A doctor is a doctor regardless of what age I am.

Andrew (age 15)
I’m excited for the opportunity to select my own endocrinologist because it’s another step in becoming more independent and learning to live my life as an adult with diabetes.

Ashley B. (age 16)
I’m honestly kind of sad that I’ll have to get a new Endo, because my Endo is so understanding and supportive of me. We’ve known her almost 9 years now, so not being able to see her anymore will be a huge deal. I’m worried about choosing a new Endo because I honestly don’t even know what to look for in an Endo. Hopefully I’ll just get a recommendation from my current Endo or something for future reference.

Ashley C. (age 14)
I don’t think it will be much different because, my mom has allowed me to switch to different endocrinologists until I found one I clicked with.

Cameron (age 17)
I’m not too worried. I think getting to choose my own is pretty cool because it’s something new and I’m not forced to be with certain doctors.

Claire (age 18)
I’m sort of nervous to get a new Endo. My pediatric endocrinologist is, hopefully, going to hold onto me as I transition into adulthood. Fingers crossed he doesn’t get tired of me soon, or else I’ll definitely be anxious about having to “adult” as I go onto college.

Lexi (age 16)
It would be something to get used to, but I wouldn’t mind it. The one I have now is great, she’s fun and understanding.

Maggie (age 16)
I am kind of scared to find a new adult endocrinologist considering I’ve had the same one since diagnosis. I am also very excited to choose my own because I know that if I find one who is just as good as my current then I can continue to stay under control and meet new people and learn more things about myself that I never knew. It’s honestly terrifying to think about but in the long run it will be the best thing for me

Mercedes (age 17)
I am excited to go to an adult endo, mostly because of the change. Where I live there isn’t much of a choice of who I can go, to but it is still exciting to see the difference in people.

Nick (age 19)
If only I got to choose my own. Unfortunately, my insurance is limiting, and only covers one doctor near me. As for moving from a pediatric to an adult endocrinologist, I feel comfortable. I’m confident in my own knowledge as well as that of my doctors.

Skylyn (age 16)
I’m not really nervous or excited about getting a new endocrinologist as I become an adult. I have been going to the same pediatric one for about a year now and I think that she will probably recommend an endocrinologist for me to go to.

Vanessa (age 16)
I am excited because I feel like they will understand better than the pediatric endocrinologist, since they deal with older patients.

 

TEEN TOPIC #52:  Your parents are usually your support system at home, along with childhood friends.  Are you nervous about setting up a support system of your own when you go away to college, or do you feel it will happen naturally as you meet people?

Lexi (age 16)
It would most likely happen as I meet people, I’m great with making friends and I love talking about my diabetes

Laura (age 17)
I feel like it will happen naturally; I never really had to set up a support system to begin with, and even if it doesn’t happen that way, there’s really nothing to fear. I can always go back to my old support system (even if they won’t be physically there) or I could just manage on my own.

Claire (age 17)
I’m not really nervous about that, as much as I am at the actual task of making new friends at college. Apart from my roommate, whom I’ve been talking to for about 4 months now, I won’t know anyone else in any of my classes. It’s a little nerve wracking, but I’m sure once I get down there it’ll be fine.

Andrew (age 15)
I am an extrovert and finding fun, supportive friends has never been a challenge for me. I view college as a chance to just branch out even more and meet more people that will be supportive of me. So I really feel comfortable finding people that will support me when I go to college.

Jessica (age 20)
Having been at college for 3 years, I have already developed a support system away from home. For me it came naturally. I am open about my diabetes and, not only do I enjoy educating others, but I feel it is important to mention in case of an emergency. I am extremely lucky that I have 2 great friends (and a few others) who look out and care for me whenever I need it. I have always been the person to have a tight, small group of friends. I like to be able to rely on a few good people than a bunch where things can get lost in translation. I am a believer that everything happens for a reason, and so, for me, I didn’t really think or look for friends to count on at college; it happened naturally – they found me just as much as I found them.

Ashley C. (age 14)
I feel it will happen naturally when I meet good friends but, I don’t expect them to support me all the time, only when I need it.

Erin (age 17)
I already have a support system other than family

Nick (age 19)
Knowing that I’m only living an hour and a half from home makes things easier. My parents and friends aren’t too far away, and I can always rely on them. But I also make sure those around me are the responsible sort, who will be able to know what to do if something does happen.

Ian (age 14)
I feel that it’ll happen naturally. I personally choose to keep my t1 to myself, and hate meeting people BECAUSE they’re t1. I prefer meeting people because we share passions and viewpoints.

Cameron (age 17)
I feel like it will probably come naturally as I meet people. Most of my friends I’ve had throughout high school have supported me so I don’t see why it would be any different at college.

Ashley B. (age 16)
I’m not too worried about setting up support networks when I move where I want to, because I’ll have even more family around me than I do now. As for the friends, I’ll meet them when I meet them, and educate them on basic diabetes care.

Mercedes (age 17)
I feel finding a support system will be a natural thing to come across. You never know that person might be a diabetic themselves.

Maggie (age 16)
Honestly I have the best support system here. I am a little nervous about going away to college but it does happen naturally. I am very good at making friends, and the first thing they know about me is I’m funny and a Type 1. All my friends now know how to check my blood sugar and give me insulin, so it will be hard leaving that. But I do know how to train and teach the new friends I meet so I think I’ll be just fine.

Annelies (age 15)
In my experience in high school so far, the new people I have met have either known someone with diabetes, or have adjusted to it. At school, it’s happened naturally and my friends have supported me and helped me. I’m hoping it’s the same once I get to college.

Vanessa (age 16)
I feel like it would happen naturally as I meet new people because no matter where I go I make new friends and keep them so I feel like it would be very easy to have new people come into my support system.

Skylyn (age 16)
I am not that worried about finding a support system away from home. I do think that it will happen naturally as I am meeting new people and becoming friends with them. Through my future jobs and things I do, I’m sure I will meet people who will support me with my diabetes care. Also I can call my parents whenever I need them for help.

Jordan (age 18)
I feel I will naturally meet people who will become my support system this fall at college, and that it isn’t something I should force out. I need to learn to do things on my own.  Trial by fire.

Julia (age 15)
I’m not really nervous about finding a new support system because my parents will still be there for me. And I think the new friends I make, if I educate them about diabetes they can help me through what my parents and childhood friends used to.

Teen Topic #51:  Do you feel like you’ve missed out on any opportunities because of diabetes, or because you felt diabetes might get in the way?

 

Jordan (age 18)
I do not feel like I have missed out on anything.  Diabetes is only an obstacle if you make it one.

Skylyn (age 16)
There have been times when I haven’t done or participated in certain activities because I thought my diabetes may be a bother or was not sure how I would manage my diabetes in those circumstances. An example is sleepovers. I usually do not go to sleepovers at friends’ houses. I am a little nervous that I may go low during the night however when I’m low I do wake up so it shouldn’t be a problem but it’s just a little worry I guess. 

Lexi (age 15)
Diabetes never gets in the way. I’ve never had to miss out on something because of my diabetes. The first few months or so of being diabetic I always got small proportions of food because we felt the need to measure everything and make sure, but now I just take what I want and guess the carbs.

Laura (age 16)
Yes, I have. I feel like diabetes is constantly weighing me down and keeping me from enjoying things that I shouldn’t have to worry about as a kid, like eating too much pizza or playing out in the sun for a long time. (Heat makes my sugar drop extremely fast.) Having these problems makes me more apt to stray away from things I might really enjoy in fear that it will affect me negatively because of diabetes.

Claire (age 17)
I do feel that way on occasion, however the feeling goes away rather quickly, as I don’t necessarily care what I’ve missed out on as a diabetic. I know deep down that the other “normal” kids are missing out on an amazing learning experience that diabetes brings into my life. Now, I definitely don’t wish diabetes on anyone, but I must say, that I wouldn’t be the person I am today without this disease I’ve been living with for going on 11 years now.

Andrew (age 14)
There are certain opportunities that I’ve missed out on because of my diabetes, for example my school had an optional trip to Utah that I wanted to go on, but I couldn’t go because I would be out in the wilderness with no cell reception, away from home and it wasn’t safe in case I went low. There are also summer camps that I’d like to go to, but can’t because it’d be a safety hazard and a liability to the camp for me to go.

Jessica (age 20)
Sometimes I feel as though diabetes can debilitate me and what I want to do in the moment, but never do I feel as though it gets in the way of my life or future goals. Sometimes I can’t go for a run or take an exam because of my blood sugars or not feeling well, which is frustrating and upsetting in the moment. Nonetheless, it has not stopped me from working towards my goals every day. In fact, I feel as though having T1D has given me opportunities and experience that I would never have gotten otherwise. I have a great support system and friends, as well as being an advocate and on television because of diabetes. All of which I would never have if not for being diagnosed.

Ashley C. (age 14)
Type 1 has only gotten in the way of activities on a temporary basis such as having to sit out during a practice to fix a low. Other than that we figure out a way to make things work.
Erin (age 17)
I’ve felt like I have had more advantages school wise vs not. But yes, diabetes gets in the way of hanging out with friends and theatre sometimes

Maggie (age 16)
When I was younger yes I did feel like I missed out on opportunities but now as I get older there really isn’t anything I can’t do. Diabetes can get in the way at some points in your life but honestly it won’t unless you let it get in the way. If you understand your symptoms and your body then you can control it and not allow diabetes to take over your whole life.

Annelies (age 15)
Yes, I do feel like I’ve missed out on opportunities due to diabetes. For example, I was supposed to be a starter for a soccer game, but my blood sugar was low and I had to sit out. Whenever diabetes gets in the way, it’s hard to remember sometimes that diabetes is only one part of me and I’ll get past it and be able to start in another game, or whatever it is I’m doing. But in the end, I know that it’s only an obstacle and it’s not the end of the world.

Nick (age 19)
I haven’t missed out on anything, but I have had to second guess myself. Particularly extended camping trips away from home. I have to check and re check that I’ve packed everything I need.

Ian (age 13)
Not at the moment. I am SEVERELY disappointed by the fact that I can only drink in minimalistic proportions. (I don’t wish to be alcoholic, but I did want to not have to worry about having more than one glass of wine or fret over the occasional flute of champagne) (This is of course, after my 21st birthday)
Cameron (age 17)
No, not really. The only bad thing about going places is always planning it around diabetes (like bringing supplies and making sure I don’t run out of things), but it’s not too bad if you do it well enough in advance. 

Ashley B. (age 15)
I don’t think that diabetes limits me on anything opportunity wise. However, there was this time that I was on a trip with my robotics team in another state (Woo, nationals!)  and we stopped at some sporting store where they were selling fudge, but I couldn’t have it because my pump site failed and I was over 300. That’s probably it.

Mercedes (age 16)
I do not feel like my diabetes keeps me from doing anything. I am just like everyone else in the world, but I just have to do a little extra to stay healthy.
Julia (age 14)
I’ve never thought diabetes to be a disadvantage in my life. I still do all the same things like my sports or music that I did before diagnosis. I don’t think that it can stop anybody if they really love it and are determined.