Teen Topic #28:  What do you like to use for lows? What’s your favorite low treat?

Mercedes (age 16)
I use fruit snacks for my low when I’m not at home because they are easy to carry around with you. When I’m home I like to drink juice, it being ether a juice box or orange juice.

Claire (age 17)
I’m pretty easy, a juice box and cookies are my all time favorite. It also makes me feel like a little kid again.

Ashley C.(age 14)
My favorite low treat is Juicy Juice ‘cause it’s amazing, or whatever I’m craving at the moment.

Erin (age 17)
Those Go-Go squeeze applesauce’s or OJ are my favorite. Glucose tabs if nothing else is on me works, too, but they have to be grape or raspberry flavored because the orange ones taste like chalk to me.

Cameron (age 17)
I usually use glucose tablets or juice boxes. Those seem to bring me up the quickest. My favorite low treat is probably my entire pantry. I get really hungry when I go low. But my parents are usually there to make sure I don’t consume the whole household.

Jessica (age 20)
I like to use Hi-C juice boxes with string cheese for lows. I find myself always thirsty when I am low and they seem to have a good amount of carbs/sugars (~25). They get the job done, taste good, have variety, and are quick to finish. The cheese stick helps to keep my numbers up and level.

Ashley B.(age 15)
My favorite thing to treat lows with are cheese crackers. Sugar pills are great, and I also like juice because it raises my sugar fairly quickly.

Nick (age 19)
It may sound weird, but milk. When I’m low, and especially when I’m tired, I’ll eat everything in sight. Afterwards I’ll feel terrible and my blood sugar will skyrocket, and I play yo-yo the rest of the day. When I drink milk, it fills me up and I don’t overdo it.

Jordan (age 18)
For lows there is only one thing I like to eat: everything.  Basically I test myself then eat anything I can get my hands on to, and then watch my number skyrocket.  This is a horrible way to treat a low and I would definitely not recommend it to any other diabetics, but it does feel amazing.

Zyler (age 16)
Honey stingers they are the best

Joseph (age 15)
I used to use skittles a lot, but recently I’ve found glucose tabs to be a lot easier to carry around, so I mainly have those now.

Vanessa (age 15)
Anything I can get my hands on, basically.

Laura (age 16)
I usually use these things called Level gels, which work pretty okay I guess. When treating a low I basically like anything that I can drink because I can get it down a lot faster and feel better sooner.

Skylyn (age 16)
For lows, I like to use juice boxes or ice cream topping because they are both fast-acting.

Lexi (age 15)
What I love to use for low treats is anything chewy and fruity, 4 years of being a diabetic (5 years on October 7th), and chalky type things start tasting bad or you just get sick of them. At home I have a stash of juice boxes for lows, too.

Ian (age 14)
My favorite low treat is undeniably ice cream. This, for me, brings my low up in a quick fashion, and also helps me from overeating when low.

Teen Topic #27: If you are allowed special accommodations during school, such as extra test time, eating snacks in class, behavior allowances, etc… (with a 504 plan, or another plan with your school), do you use those accommodations? Please explain.

Mercedes (age 16)
The only special accommodations that I use is that I can eat in class, test in class, and that I can use my phone if needed. There are other accommodations that are on my 504 plan but I don’t use them, like going to get a drink whenever I want or going to the bathroom whenever. I mostly don’t use these ones because the teachers tend to not know about them.

Claire (age 17)
I always use my accommodations! They’re put there to help me manage everything, and let me continue to care for my diabetes while still going to school. For example, I have one accommodation that allows me to be late to school if my blood sugar is too low for me to drive. I have yet to use this, but if it comes to it, and I happen to be low one morning I’m running extra late, I will most definitely use it.

Ashley C. (age 14)
I get the extra test time but I never use it. If my blood sugar is low in class I’ll eat in class. I’m not going to leave just because other students don’t have any food. And I’m held responsible for my actions diabetes or not.

Erin (age 17)
I am allowed special accommodations but I haven’t had to use them this year.

Cameron (age 16)
I only use accommodations for major tests, such as the PSAT’s, SAT’s, or AP Tests. With these, I test by myself in a separate room and can stop the clock if I go low or have to use the restroom. At my school, most teachers allow everyone to have food/drink in the classroom. In the cases in which the classroom is a peanut-free zone due to allergies present in the class, I step outside into the hallway to treat myself.

Jessica (age 20)
I have always had a 504 with accommodations for school and continue to do so in college. I have always felt it better safe than sorry. In college, things are set up differently than in grade school. Therefore, I either plan for accommodations with the professor or with our disability services coordinator. I take the extra time because it is hard to ensure that the professor will have time to proctor if need be on the fly, and you can never predict blood sugars so better to have everything in place just in case. In grade school I always managed to just stay after with the teacher or come earlier if necessary. In college, food and drink gets difficult with lab classes, but there is always a way to manage if the line of communication is kept open; and I have never had any issues with food or drink in any class.

Ashley B. (age 15)
I absolutely use the 504 plan in school. I use the accommodations for the PSAT, end of course exams, and stuff like that.

Nick (age 19)
I’m allowed to have food and drink in class, as well as what I refer to as an “infinite hall pass,” that lets me go to the bathroom whenever I want. I don’t use that one much, but I do eat and drink in class when I need to. If I didn’t, my blood sugar would be all over the place.

Jordan (age 17)
Yes, I do use them because I believe they are essential to success as a diabetic in school.  During every day school I feel that this is not a big issue, but during testing periods, especially long ones like AP Tests, The SAT, and The ACT, it is important to use these 504 plans because when your number is high or low you are not performing to the best of your abilities, and on tests like these that determine your future it is important to be performing at maximum capacity.

Zyler (age 16)
I only use my accommodations when I really need to.

Ian (age 14)
I am allowed accommodations in school, and I will use them occasionally, but only if needed, unless totally and unavoidably necessary.  I find that using them ostracizes me from the rest of my fellow classmates and can set me behind in the regards of my schoolwork.

Joseph (age 15)
I am allowed to eat a snack during class, but this isn’t a special thing since as long as you’re quiet, everyone can do it. I am able to leave class using a certain pass I have if I have an emergency, though.

Vanessa (age 15)
I’ve used some, as far as I would stop a test because I realized my blood sugar was high/low. I try not to use them just so I don’t get comments from people such as “oh she’s special and gets what she wants” etc.

Laura (age 16)
I try not to use these if I don’t have to because I like to feel like just another kid in school. I don’t like feeling like I get special treatment. If I really needed to though, I’d use the accommodations.

Skylyn (age 16)
I know that I do have the 504 plan for at school but it doesn’t make any difference. It’s like it doesn’t even exist. And honestly, I am fine with that. I don’t need all these special accommodations.

Lexi (age 15)
Mostly I use the snack thing. I don’t ask for a longer time to take a test or anything like that. And hey, us teens eat a lot so of course teen diabetics are going to use that for eating in class.

Teen Topic #26: What would you like your friends to know about your T1D?

Ashley C. (age 14)
What to do if I pass out or can’t help myself.  They will be able to know how to use my meter and pump if in case I physically can’t do it.

Cole (age 15)
I got this. I’m not going to die at the drop of a hat. Unhooking my pump tubing from my cannula will not make me faint or have a seizure or explode. I’ve been doing perfectly fine these last five years and I’m going to do perfectly fine for the next 50. Thank you for being there and worrying about me and wanting to learn what’s happening to me and how you can help but REMEMBER: I AM NOT A MAYFLY. I WILL LIVE A LONG FULL LIFE. YOU DO NOT HAVE TO WORRY SO MUCH (but thanks for doing it anyways).

Zyler (age 16)
All my friends know about it and help me with it.

Joseph (age 15)
I guess if I had to let them know anything (besides what I’ve already told them), I’d tell them that at this point it’s a very manageable condition that becomes so much of a part of your daily routine, that you barely even think about it.

Erin (age 17)
I’d like my friends to know that I am not different or a freak. I have hopes and aspirations like you, but sometimes I just have obstacles to face with diabetes that cause delays. I wish it was easy to control but it’s not, and I can’t help if I have mood swings or don’t feel like doing something. Diabetes will not define me as a person and that’s how you define me. I have diabetes, and it’s not fair to be judged for it.

Sean (age 14)
I would like my friends to know that I CAN eat whatever I want whenever I want, as long as I take my insulin. I would also like for them to know that diabetes doesn’t mean I can’t have any sugar at all (that’s what every one of my non-diabetic friends thought).

Nick (age 19)
First of all, yes, I can eat sugar. I make sure they know they will see me with needles and when I am bleeding, so if they’re squeamish they should let me know.

Laura (age 16)
That it’s a very serious thing and I sometimes have a hard time taking care of myself. It shouldn’t be treated as a joke, and I’m not just neglecting myself because I’m lazy or don’t care. Any fellow T1D can agree with me, that it’s an everyday battle and can be very draining.

Vanessa (age 15)
I like my friends to know what to look out for if my blood-sugar is going high or low so they can be there to remind me I might need to check. So far all of my friends  have been very supportive and understanding.

Lexi (age 15)
I’d like for them to know when my blood sugar is low or high that I’m not being dramatic. When I have to test my sugar, they need to not get scared with the blood. And last of all, yes, site changes can hurt and yes pricking my finger can hurt. No I am not immune to pain. There is no such thing as “the bad kind of diabetes” and there is no “cure” for it.

Cameron (age 16)
I’d like my friends to know that they don’t have to be sorry that I have it. Every time after someone finds out they say they’re sorry. Yeah, it’s nice and all, but I can’t help it so there’s no point in playing the victim card. You might as well make the best of it since it’s going to be a part of your life.

Skylyn (age 16)
I would like my friends to first of all know that I am a Type 1 diabetic and that it is not because I ate too much sugar. Also, I would like them to know what to do when I am very low/high. Reminding and making sure I bolused for what I ate is always nice, too.

Jordan (age 17)
I would like them to know that it’s really not that bad unless I don’t take care of myself.

Ashley B. (age 15)
I want my friends to know how to recognize the signs of being high or low, and knowing that I should eat something if needed. Also, in case of emergencies to not panic and just handle the situation appropriately

Claire (age 17)
My friends already know everything really. Well, the basics, and that’s all they really need to know. Well, that, and if I fall unconscious to call 911, and jab my Glucagon in my thigh.

Joshua (age 18)
That it is an autoimmune disease that isn’t very easy to manage no matter how easy I make it look. Yes, I can eat everything you can eat, and yes I can manage my disease enough to be a normal person just like you.

Jessica (age 20)
The one and only thing that I would like my friends to know about my T1D is that I need just a few more seconds of time. Whenever we go out to eat or some place that I need to be checking and bolusing, it would be nice if they could just wait a few extra seconds for me to fit that all in without having to miss a beat. It is easy to get side tracked and not bolus or check when everyone else doesn’t have to worry so they run off to the next activity.

Mercedes (age 16)
I will mention that I have type 1 to my friends and after that I will tell my friends whatever they want to know. I answer any questions they have.

Ian (age 13)
I want them to know that it is NOT CAUSED BY OBESITY AND I DON’T HAVE TO LIMIT MY DIET IN ANY WAY and, that I take great offense to any wisecracks about the disease.

Teen Topic #25: With the new school year upon us, do you or your parents personally talk to your new teachers or coaches about your T1?  Why or why not? What kinds of things do you tell them?

Nick (age 19)
I talk to them, because if I ever have an issue, it’s easier to say “Hey, I need to take care of my diabetes” than explaining that I have it in that moment. I don’t want to cause more of a disruption than I need to, so I make sure to talk to them in private either before or after the first class period. I tell them I may need to eat during class, or leave to use the restroom frequently. I also make sure they know what my insulin pump is. I had one particularly nasty run in with a substitute who was convinced I was texting.

Laura (age 16)
My parents don’t. I go to a sort of small school, and everyone knows me and knows I have Type 1 diabetes, so it’s not really necessary.

Vanessa (age 15)
My mom talks to all of my teachers so they all know. She has a meeting with all of them to go over my 504 plan and to tell them about Type 1. She does that before school starts to avoid any problems that may occur.

Cameron (age 16)
My mom will email my teachers every year before the first day to tell them about it. My tennis coach has remembered since my freshman year, and he’s a type 2 so he can relate to me a little bit.

Skylyn (age 16)
My parents don’t talk to teachers but they do talk to the school nurse and make sure she knows what to do with my supplies. Since I am a sophomore, the nurse isn’t involved as much as she used to be. She keeps log sheets in her office for me write my numbers on at lunch time. She also checks to make sure I have enough supplies in the office, and write notes for me to bring more supplies in when it’s running low.

Ashley B (age 15)
My parents talk to my teachers about T1 so the teacher doesn’t think that I’m not supposed to be doing shots or eating snacks in class.

Claire (age 17)
When I go back to school, especially in High School, there’s really no reason to personally talk to ALL my teachers. I just go in on the first day, say “Hey! I’m Claire, and I’m your T1D student!” They usually respond with a, “Oh! That’s you! I was told about you! If you ever need anything, just let me know!” Sometimes they ask questions about how it works, and I tell them. And then it’s chill for the rest of the year.

Josh (age 18)
Yes, so they know what my needs are, like how I might need to leave class or the sport for a short period of time to fix my blood sugar.

Jessica (age 20)
In grade school it was mainly my mom who spoke to the teachers at the beginning of every school year. We would have a meeting with my guidance counselor and the nurse, as well, to go over my plan of action for the year. I would chime in every now and then with comments, but she was usually the one to formally introduce everything. Now that I am in college, I go to my professors and give them a letter from the school stating my accommodations and needs. After that, it is up to them whether or not they want to meet and go into further detail. However, it is up to me to start the conversation. (And so far I haven’t met one professor that didn’t understand). Whenever introducing myself and my diabetes I usually go over what my protocols are for high and low blood sugars, need for food and drink, and what happens if I need to take a sick day.

Mercedes (age 16)
I tell all my teachers about my diabetes. I just say “I have Type 1 diabetes .”  I tell them so they know what to expect from me. Some teachers will have questions and some don’t. I reassure them that I can take care of my diabetes and they don’t have to worry.

Jordan (age 17)
We don’t need to talk to the teachers because the school tells them.  If a teacher says anything then I just tell them that I have diabetes and that the nurse should have sent them a paper.  I handle everything on my own, and rarely need to leave class to visit the nurse.

Ian (age 13)
No. We told them the basics the year I was diagnosed, but from then on I had no troubles.

Ashley C. (age 14)
I thought all teachers were required to know if a student has a disease but apparently that don’t always get communicated, so I have to personally tell them all about it. I tell them I might have to leave every once and a while for my diabetes but I won’t use it as an excuse.

Cole (age 15)
Not really. I’m in high school and extremely independent so even though I have supplies in the nurse’s office, I rarely use it and don’t really feel the need to tell everyone about it personally. Sometimes, if it could be pertinent, we will tell the teacher, but only if it affects the class. Also I don’t really play sports but when I did we would tell the coach so we could make a plan for games and practices about my sugars.

Zyler (age 16)
I tell my coaches and teachers just so they know.  They all are very understanding and will let you eat or take shots in class if you need to.

Joseph (age 15)
I usually let my teachers know that I have T1 and that I may need to eat a snack or possibly go to the health room during class. All my teachers so far have been fine with that so that’s what I stick with.

Erin (age 17)
I personally tell teachers if I feel low or my sugar is high. Otherwise I feel like the school tells them. Most of my school knows I’m diabetic so most teachers know before I tell them

Sean (age 14)
My parents and I both always talk to my teachers and coaches beforehand so that they are aware of my diabetes and what lows and highs look like and what they should look for. I do this every year just so the teacher at least has an idea of how to tell if I need some help or not.