Teen Topic #50: What changes in your personal diabetes care will you make as you get older? Do you feel your parents set a certain standard to follow? Do you feel it’s unattainable on your own? 

 

Jordan (age 18)
I think as I get older I will learn more about how important it is to take care of myself. I know I need to test more often and be giving insulin before I eat. I feel like my parents have definitely set a standard, but it’s not unreasonable.

Skylyn (age 16)
There will be changes as I get older and live on my own. One change would be testing my blood sugar in the middle of the night. I more than likely will not do that anymore since my parents test me in the middle of the night now and they won’t be there. I do wake myself up when I am low so then of course I would test and eat something. Otherwise, I will just test before I go to bed and when I get up in the morning.

Lexi (age 16)
I’m not exactly sure, I know as I get older a few things are going to need to change.

Laura (age 17)
I think as I get older I’ll grow more mature and be more precise with my diabetes care. Being a teenager, I feel as if I’m not quite as responsible as I could be. My parents do try to set standards but I disregard a lot of them because although they might know diabetes through facts or textbook, I know my own body personally which makes some of their standards or suggestions faulty as they don’t work with me.

Julia (age 15)
There are a lot of changes that you may have to make on your own as you go to college or when you leave your house. I think a big one would be changing your pump settings by yourself. My nurse has always done that for me so I’m trying to start to transition to doing it by myself but I think that will be difficult to do. But I do believe that it is easily attainable if I work on it now.

Claire (age 17)
I don’t think I’ll make any drastic changes to my diabetes care, other than being better at caring for myself than I am now. My parents certainly do set a standard for me, however I’m not entirely sure it is attainable on my own. But that’s why my parents will always be a phone call away, so if I need their help while I’m at school they’ll be by my side the whole way.

Andrew (age 14)
As I get older I’ll certainly test more and be more careful in the food I choose to eat because as I get older I lose the ability to read my body as accurately as I could when I was younger and my more particular care helps make up for that loss. Goals for my diabetes care have always been attainable for me because my parents have given me a large amount of freedom since I was young and because of that freedom I’ve grown more capable of meeting my own A1C standards and goals.

Jessica (age 20)
As I get older I find myself becoming more independent. I started by checking on my own, giving my own shots, and have now progressed to ordering my own medical supplies. My parents have set an outline and standard for me since day one and I try to follow it. Health should always be a number one priority, but that doesn’t mean that diabetes should keep you from doing what you love; it can just delay things sometimes. I try hard to keep diabetes on the top of the list, however, I sometimes lose sight of that and have to re-group to regain my health and get back on track. Stress, school and my social life begin to creep to the top of the list and diabetes can slowly move towards the bottom. Nonetheless, I am pretty good at recognizing when this happens and try to fix it and/or communicate with my parents for some advice or help. Diabetes management can feel like a burden and getting back on track can seem unattainable, but encouragement from my parents and time helps me hit the ground running again. For the most part, I manage and take care of my diabetes on my own (aside from the reminders and nagging from my parents).

Ashley C. (age 14)
I’ll take better care of myself. My mom’s standards aren’t unattainable, she just wants me to check at least twice a day and take insulin.  I can do it by myself, I just choose not to.

Erin (age 17)
As I get older I know I will need to fully manage my appointments.  My parents do not set a certain standard for me.

Maggie (age 16)
The changes I will make when I get older will be that I will have to become more independent when it comes to my sites. I would also have to figure out how my pump works. I know most of it, but there are a few things I still need to learn. I feel like my parents do set a certain standard for me to live by and I feel as though I am independent with my diabetes care, but it is always good to have them behind me when I need help or don’t understand something.

Annelies (age 15)
I feel like my parents set a pretty good standard for me to follow. They taught me that I should have everything in moderation, and to test anytime something feels off or before meals. They also taught me that I’m not defined by diabetes, and that it’s only a small part of me.

Nick (age 19)
I don’t see any changes coming, besides adapting to new treatments (like pumps/CGM’s). My routine has been working well, and it’s easy enough to modify. Small adjustments to carb ratios and things like that.

Ian (age 14)
I feel the need to acquire a service dog before I move out of the house.  I don’t wake up when I am low or high at night even with alarms. I feel that I’ll follow my parent’s standards, and annex my own.

Cameron (age 17)
I don’t think I’ll change much. My parents did set a foundation for how I should manage certain situations, so I’ll probably just keep doing what I’m doing now.

Ashley B. (age 16)
As of right now, I can’t think of anything that I’d change in my diabetes care. Everything that I have going on (basals, ratios, carb counting, etc) seems as if they’re working. As for the level of attainability, I think that I won’t have very many problems taking care of myself when I’m older. They’ve shown me how to take care of myself, even if I sometimes forget something simple – like checking ketones when I’m sick.

Mercedes (age 17)
The changes that I will make in my personal  diabetes care for when I get older are not too different  from what I’m doing now. I will still take care of myself the best that I can. The only difference there will be is that I won’t have my parents there 24/7 to help me out.

 

TEEN TOPIC #49:  Do you blame anyone or anything for your having diabetes?

Erin (age 17)
No , and I don’t blame myself either.

Claire (age 17)
On occasion I blame my parents for their crappy genetics, but I only ever do that jokingly. I truly don’t blame anyone for what happened; it was really just a freak thing.

Laura (age 16)
I try not to blame anyone or anything, because to be honest there’s no one to blame. Everyone has to deal with something, and I suppose diabetes is my something.

Jordan (age 18)
If you want to be technical, it most likely came from one of my parents, but no, I don’t blame anyone.  If we are being honest, I blame my pancreas, that dumb thing.

Ashley C. (age 14)
I don’t even know who I’d blame for me getting diabetes, but I had a lot of personal things happening around the time I got it and I sometimes feel like if that stuff didn’t happen then I wouldn’t have gotten diabetes.

Vanessa (age 15)
I don’t blame anyone or anything, I just feel as if God felt I was a strong enough person to handle something like this and it’s just something I get to deal with on my adventure called life.

Ashley B. (age 15)
I don’t blame anyone or anything for having diabetes, it is what it is, and soon there will be a scientific reasoning for why I have diabetes and others don’t.

Julia (age 15)
No, it’s no one’s fault that I got diabetes. Yes it is a genetic thing but no one person caused me to have it.

Skylyn (age 16)
I don’t blame anyone or anything for my diabetes. I believe that it was just meant to be and that there is a purpose for me having diabetes. I don’t know what that purpose is but what I do know is that I have had great times and met amazing people because of my diabetes.

Jessica (age 20)
I was diagnosed with diabetes in a unique way. We found out early, so I was never hospitalized. We also believe that I got diabetes after having a virus and being on medication. However, I don’t blame anyone or anything. I am a firm believer in everything happens for a reason and there isn’t a hand dealt to me that I can’t handle. I have been thriving with diabetes and have been blessed with many opportunities because of it. It has shaped the person I am today and who I strive to be every day.

Nick (age 19)
Definitely not. There’s no one who made the choice to give me diabetes, and my parents had nothing but good intentions when having me. My having diabetes is just something that happened, with no one at fault.

Mercedes (age 16)
I do not blame anyone or anything for my diabetes. It wasn’t anyone’s fault, it just happens sometimes and there’s nothing you or anyone could have done differently to change that.

Cameron (age 17)
No, not really. I know eating a lot of sugar doesn’t give you diabetes, and there is nothing you can do to avoid T1.

Lexi (age 15)
Not at all. Diabetes is something you can’t stop. And for me I don’t know exactly where my diabetes really came from, like family wise.

 

 

Teen Topic #48: Does having diabetes make you worried about having children?

 

Skylyn (age 16)
Having diabetes doesn’t really make me nervous about having kids. I mean I’m sure when I get older and start dating more, it may concern me more. However, I’m only 16 and do not want to be a teen mom. In the future, I may be more worried but right now I don’t worry about it.

Julia (age 14)
I’m not worried at all about having children. Under normal circumstances, a diabetic giving birth doesn’t have unusual complications.

Lexi (age 16)
It worries me very much. I have looked up possible effects that having a kid could do to you. It’s hard to manage your blood sugars most of the time. Diabetics are more likely to have a miscarriage. It’s so scary thinking about the possibilities.

Vanessa (age 16)
Yes, and I’ve thought about it ever since I was diagnosed. I was always scared that no one would want to marry me knowing I have diabetes because they don’t want their child to be at risk of getting it. And I’ve always been scared that if I did have children when I get older that they would get it and I would feel horrible and I would feel like it was my fault and that they didn’t deserve that. It’s always been a concern but I don’t think I would ever try not to have kids for that reason.

Ashley B. (age 16)
Even if I did want children, diabetes wouldn’t worry me. The only thing is the possible birth defects that the baby can receive if your blood sugar is too high.

Jordan (age 18)
I do worry some.  I know that my children are more likely to get diabetes because I have it.  I also know that if they do get diabetes we will know exactly what to do, so that part doesn’t worry me.  I just don’t want my kids to have to deal with diabetes at all.

Erin (age 17)
Kind of, but I am more worried with another condition I have in addition to diabetes called PCOS, which is common for diabetics to get.

Claire (age 17)
All the time. It makes me scared that I’ll give my children the burden that I have, and even though it’s incredibly manageable, I don’t wish this burden on anyone, let alone my own children. 

Laura (age 17)
YES! I actually think about this often. I’m not afraid of having a kid and then them getting diabetes; I’m afraid of being able to have kids at all. I haven’t really looked into it too much since it’s pretty far off, but I don’t know. I’m just afraid that there will be complications or something.

Ashley C. (age 14)
Actually I haven’t really thought of it because that’s forever away, so let’s not think about it.
Jessica (age 20)
Yes, diabetes does make me worry about having children. I am not as aware as I should be about the genetic component of passing it along, but I know there is a high percentage. I personally fear the pregnancy more than taking care of my child. My health is already shaky on a daily basis and I never feel well, so who know what can happen when I am pregnant. My immune system is already so compromised I’m afraid it won’t be a pleasant journey. Nonetheless, I still want to have children naturally. I feel as though having a child with diabetes will help me to better take care of myself since we will be doing everything together and I will be teaching them all that I have learned over the years. This disease is one that only us T1Ds can relate to, which is something that I will share and cherish with my child. Having children scares me, but it’s something I’ve always wanted and I will overcome the battle when the time comes.

Nick (age 20)
I’m aware of the possibility; diabetes is very prevalent in my family. I’ve talked it over with my fiancée multiple times, and we’re confident it’s something we can handle, especially with the advances in treatment. But yes, it still worries me.

Mercedes (age 17)
I am not at all worried about having kids. Now days we have so many things to help you have a healthy  baby. There is a risk of them also getting diagnosed , but if you think about it, you already know what it is and how to treat it.

Cameron (age 17)
It doesn’t worry me at all. It’s typically not genetic, or it skips a generation, so it looks like my grandchildren can be blessed with my Type 1. Even if my children are diagnosed, at least I have experience and will know what to do.

 

 

Teen Topic 47:  So many things in diabetes care are important.  Do you feel some are less important and can be ignored during periods of burnout? (example: changing your lancet). Or do you feel that once you start letting things go it’s a dangerous downward spiral?

Skylyn (age 16)
I do feel that some things are more important than others when it comes to my diabetes care. The most important thing for me is giving insulin at mealtimes or when I feel high to get my BG numbers under control. One thing I tend to ignore and get sick of is the sensor. It’s wanting a calibration often and the numbers being off is very annoying. Also to me, I feel it is not needed all the time and can be more of a burden than a benefit.

Julia (age 14)
There’s not many things I consider to be “not important”.  I think if you forget to change your lancet that’s not a big deal but if you continually forget to check your sugar or take insulin that could turn bad very quickly.

Erin (age 17)
I feel some can be ignored. I honestly forget to change my lancet a lot and I don’t always check as many times as I’m supposed to some days but some days schedules are different so that factors in to.

Claire  (age 17)
I do feel like when you start to let things go it can turn into a downward spiral. However, I don’t really think changing ones lancet has to be an every check thing, let alone an everyday thing.

Laura (age 17)
I honestly have not changed my lancet in probably a month or two. I feel like little things like that aren’t too important, since there are more prominent things to take care off. (bolusing, checking BG, etc.) Taking a break from the small things isn’t a downwards spiral as long as you keep the important ones in check.

Ashley C. (age 14)
Not really, cause using the lancet example I only change that when its time change. I mean I think it’s really people’s opinions on what you can let go and what you can’t.

Jessica (age 20)
I definitely believe that certain aspects of diabetes care can be ignored while still being in control and healthy. Changing lancets, using alcohol wipes every time, etc. are time consuming and, in my opinion, wasteful. A lancet is good for more than one use, there is no need to get rid of it after one single test. Nonetheless, I believe that the things that can be ignored are few and far between. Furthermore, I agree with the idea that this can lead to a dangerous downward spiral, and quickly. I say this from personal experience. In the hustle and bustle of life it is easy to skimp on one thing, and then another, until finally you haven’t changed a lancet in months, site in days, or checked in hours. What I feel is most important is that each diabetic finds their happy medium. Find a routine that works for you and stick to it. I don’t change my lancet that often, but I change my site (and sensor) when I shower. This helps me stay on track and manage my care.

Nick (age 20)
It certainly depends on what kind of person you are. As long as there’s a system you follow, a little slacking is okay. For example, I change my lancet every time I open a new bottle of strips. The only thing I can think of where slacking could lead to a downward spiral is not testing. Once you go a day or two without testing, it’s very easy to stop all together.

Mercedes (age 17)
There are some things I think that are less important, but I don’t think they should be ignored all of the time, sometimes is alright. If you do slack on some of the less important ones you might accidentally  stop it all together.

Cameron (age 17)
Well personally, I don’t even remember the last time I changed my lancet, and I’m still doing really well. Of course you want to change out your pump site (or give a shot for your meal) and test your blood sugar. Other than those two things, all the others can be ignored during periods of burnout.

Lexi (age 16)
Sometimes it depends on the situation. Maybe your site might be falling off, you could probably get some tape for it. Always carry a food source around or anything that’s 12 carbs or more. But sometimes certain things aren’t necessary to carry around every day. Mostly the things you should carry around every day would be your meter, something to eat, and most likely a site or needles.

Vanessa (age 16)
I feel as if no one is the perfect diabetic, and if you are props to you. But changing your lancet every time or changing the needle on your pen every single time you use it, to me is just annoying and I don’t do it. Maybe it’s dangerous for me but I’ve been doing it for 11 years now and I’ve had no problems at all.

 

Ashley B. (age 16)
I think that some things aren’t as important if you’ve had diabetes after a while. If you know what you use a lot or never use then it’s easy to rank them on their levels of priority. Changing lancets isn’t something that I really do that often.