TEEN TOPICS – WEEK 76:  Have you ever done any babysitting?  If so, did you tell the parents that you have T1?  If you haven’t done any babysitting, do you think that parents need to know if their babysitter has T1?

Annelies (age 15)
I believe the parents have a right to know, so they know just in case something happens. It’s important for someone of authority to know so if an emergency happens, they know why or what to do.

Andrew (age 15)
Personally, I have never babysat, but I do think it is important to ensure the parents of the child be fully aware of what your diabetes means and how capable you are of handling your diabetes. As long as you tell the parents you’re diabetic, the possible complications of diabetes (so they know what they’re getting into), and you ensure them you’re capable of taking care of your diabetes, you should be fine.


Cameron (age 18)
I have never babysat, but I do think it is important to tell someone if you have T1. They need to know who they are leaving their kids in the hands of. I mean if I had my kids with a babysitter and came home to find a syringe in the trash can, I wouldn’t be too happy. This is why they should know if you have T1 if you’re babysitting.


Caroline (age 15)
I babysit a lot. It took me some time to work up some courage to be comfortable with watching other children that weren’t my siblings and making sure that my blood sugar was in range so that I had the maximum ability to make the best decisions possible for the care of the children. I try to make sure my blood sugar is as stable as possible when I’m babysitting so I can make the best decisions. I always talk to the parents before they leave and let them know that I have Type 1 diabetes. I explain what that is, what it means for me, and what my methods of care are while I am babysitting. If the children are old enough, I always show them where my low supplies are so that they know if something were to happen.


Christina (age 15)
No, I haven’t done any babysitting yet. I do believe that the parents you are babysitting for need to know you have diabetes just so they are aware in case of emergency. However, it doesn’t need to be a big deal; you can just say, “I just want to let you know I have T1D. But I am fully capable of taking care of myself and should have no problems. But I just would like to be upfront with you about it.” It’s better for them to know in case you have a hypo and you pass out and they walk in.

Claire (age 18)
I have done a lot of babysitting, and it’s courtesy to let the parents know of your, possibly, life threatening illness, because they need to know and be able to decide whether they want to take you on as a babysitter. However, most parents aren’t rude and won’t hire a diabetic, they ask questions, and get to understand your situation better, at least from my experience. The great part though is when you get to babysit other diabetic kids, which I’ve done, and being able to help them with their stuff is so cool, and educational, because every kid has a different set up, system, and way to get insulin.

Erin (age 18)
I have babysat and the parents knew because I used to hang out/ play with the kids.

Haley (age 14)
The only babysitting I’ve done so far is for my siblings and cousins. If I were to babysit for someone outside of my family, I think they should be aware that I’m diabetic. I don’t think being T1D should prevent me from babysitting, but I would want them to at least know why I’m carrying syringes with me and doing injections or bg checks.

Ian (age 15)
I have only done cat sitting. However, I believe that the parents should only know if the babysitter would be unable to fulfill his/her duties.

Jordan (age 19)
I have babysat for the boy down the street, because he also has T1.  That is why his parents asked me to babysit.  If I babysat for someone else, I would definitely tell them that I have diabetes.  I think they have a right to know if the person charged with caring for the child has a medical condition that could affect their care.
Julia (age 15)
I haven’t done any babysitting but I would absolutely let the parents know about my diabetes.

Laura (age 18)

I have never babysat before, other than my nephews, but my whole family is aware that I have T1. I don’t think it’s the utmost importance that the parents know about T1. Unless the person babysitting feels as if they aren’t under stable control of their diabetes, I don’t really think it’s a big deal because they can just take care of themselves. It doesn’t hurt to let them know, though.

Lexi (age 16)
Most babysitting I’ve done is with my mom’s friend who knows I have diabetes and the kid was definitely able to understand this type of stuff so they both knew my issue and all that comes with it.

Maggie (age 17)
I have babysat before. The parents knew I was a diabetic and I babysit for a diabetic so I take care of him and myself. You should let the parent know that you’re t1d just in case of emergency.

Vanessa (age 16)
I have never, and if I have it’s been with another friend there and it wasn’t my job I was just helping my friend. I definitely think the parents should know, and I think they should also know if the person takes care of them self just so that they know there’s not a big chance of something bad happening to their babysitter while they’re gone and that the attention is on their kids.


**To see all of the previous topics, please visit our archive at https://pbntype1teens.wordpress.com **

TEEN TOPICS – WEEK 75:  How do you handle your diabetes and D supplies when doing active things, such as sports, beach days, skiing, etc…? 

Annelies (age 15)
With my blood sugar, I usually try to find out how to manage my IOB so I don’t drop during games or practice. I usually have someone watch my stuff or keep it close enough to be able to access it quickly. With treating, I think it depends. If I’m low I usually try to have juice nearby especially on hot days, and if I’m high, I have to be really careful with how much insulin I dose.

Andrew (age 15)
When playing sports, I always have a kit in both my sports bag and in the medical bag that our team takes to every game and practice. I also keep low supplies in my bag and the medical bag in case I need them. Whenever I’m doing an activity, I always test before the activity, at least once during the activity, and after to make sure my numbers stay in line. I do give myself a higher basal during sports to address my adrenaline rush and I drop the rates after to accompany the drop in blood sugar due to my activity.

Ashley (age 16)
I’ll check my blood sugar before I do an activity and see what I’m at and go from there. With my supplies I’ll normally take my pump off and keep my other things in a cooler.

Cameron (age 18)
I always put my supplies in a sling bag and brng that bag with me everywhere. I play tennis, so I keep my pump in my pocket like it usually is, and I keep my CGM in my tennis bag and will look at it occasionally.


Caroline (age 15)
When I am doing my activities such as marching band and beach days, I have an “Otter Box” that I put my CGM & PDM in. The “Otter Box” is sand proof, wind proof, water proof, etc & keeps my devices dry & cool. I keep these devices in the “Otter Box” & my low supplies, snacks, etc as well as my insulin in a cooler to keep it cool. I keep them safe by combining the “Otter Box” & the cooler in a specific bag that is labeled just for diabetes. When I need to test or treat I use the hand sanitizer that I have in my diabetes bag when I don’t have access to soap and water to wash my hands.


Christina (age 15)
As a cross country and track runner, taking care of my diabetes is super important. I rarely drop while I’m running but before practice, or a cross country race, I always put a little fruit snack pack in my sports bra, so I can grab them if I feel like I am dropping during a run. I do not carry any other supplies with me while I’m running, but for indoor season I carry my test kit with me to the sidelines in my spike bag. I usually test right before I start to warm up and if I’m too low for my liking I will have something small but if my sugar is fine I don’t test again until after my race. I’ve found that this works for me, but everyone is different, especially with how their sugars react to exercise.

Claire (age 18)
 I handle my diabetes just like I normally do, I keep my supplies as close as I can. However, considering I used to Rodeo and I horseback ride quite often, I can’t really keep all my supplies up on the horse with me, so I keep them either with my parents when I rodeo, or safe in the truck.  It’s typically the truck considering I’m 18 now and they have given me my space to be independent, which I greatly appreciate.

Erin (age 18)
I think it depends on the activity location and intensity of activity. For example, in the winter I keep my supplies inside somewhere out of the cold while sledding but if I feel low I go in to check. Last summer I went to the beach and just kept my supplies in and a bag in the shade because it was cooler than leaving in a car. The only sport I can say what it’s like with is volleyball, and I was allowed to keep my bag near me off the court and wear Med id. I played less than others because I went low a lot during practices. As for where to keep supplies safe,that in the end is just judging the situation you’ll be in ahead of time. Always put your diabetes first and check when you feel unwell and treat with what you have on you or find a way to get food that you need to treat near your activity you are involved in.

Haley (age 14)
Whenever I’m playing sports it’s not that big of a deal for me to handle my diabetes and supplies. I always do a bg check before I get started and determine if I need a snack to keep me from going low. I keep my supplies in my backpack on the sidelines, and there’s always someone who knows where it is in case of an emergency. Going to the beach is a little trickier for me if my parents aren’t around (if they are, they keep up with my stuff). If I’m only going to be on the beach for an hour or two I keep my meter and something for lows in a small insulated bag inside a drawstring backpack. I make sure to do bg checks more frequently when I’m out swimming.

Ian (age 15)
The only thing that I do if that sort is bicycling, and when I do that, I attach it to my luggage rack. When I dance, I keep my bag in the studio and keep my pump on and tucked away. If I need to decrease basal, instead of stopping to adjust, I quickly and discretely unplug my pump from the site, and plug it back in when I no longer don’t need it.

Jordan (age 19)
Before I exercise I make sure my number is not too low – and if it’s close to low I’ll eat a snack uncovered.  I always make sure I have extra juice or Gatorade on hand in case I go low.  I take my pump off and put it in my backpack with my other supplies and try to set it somewhere out of the sun.

Julia (age 15)
I always keep my diabetes supplies on the bench while playing sports and our manager always carries them with her when we move. I wear a pouch around my stomach and keep my pump in that during games.

Laura (age 18)
Whenever I’m out and about doing “active things” I do the same thing as I would any other time. I carry my supplies in a backpack or something, and I keep it with me at all times. Sometimes I change what I carry based off what I’ll be doing. (i.e. extra snacks/juice if I’m doing heavy exertion.) I test/treat as needed.


Lexi (age 16)
If I’m ever on a big trip that lasts longer than 3 days and I’m hours away or something I make sure I pack extras just in case. With sports I bring a poweraid and take sips out of it every so often to keep my sugars from dropping.


Maggie (age 17)
I always carry a bag with me with juice, a meter, and sites. Depending on the activity I may take my pump off and put it in my bag. Sometimes I may go on shots if I know my sites won’t stay in. I usually test every 2 hours if I’m doing large amount of activity like swimming and I’ll correct if I feel like I’m dropping or if I know I’m dropping. I’ll also check to make sure I’m not going too high. If I do take off my pump and I’ll sit out and correct for that if it’s necessary.

McKenna (age 16)
I bring extra supplies when I’m doing active things. I keep my supplies in a little purse so it doesn’t bring a lot of attention. I keep the supplies safe by being careful with everything I do. I test and treat like usual but if it’s during a sporting event such as basketball I check during half time and give a unit if needed. Otherwise everything stays the same.

Skylyn (age 17)
On days when I’m going to be doing something active, I just kinda deal with the circumstances and do what I know. For example, if I’m going swimming at the lake or something, I’ll leave my pump and supplies with someone who isn’t swimming or I’ll leave it in the car in a bag on the floor out of the sun near something cold so it won’t overheat. If I feel low or anything, I’ll just go test and treat myself.

TEEN TOPICS – WEEK 74: Do you wear any sort of sensor/cgm (Dexcom or Enlite)?  Why or why not?  What do you like/dislike about it?  

Annelies (age 15)
I wear a Dexcom, and I like the security it gives me. The site hurts a little going in, but it’s worth it.

Andrew (age 15)
I do wear a cgm, an Enlite cgm to be exact, that is linked to my Medtronic 630g pump. I wear a cgm because it allows me to have a better understanding of my blood sugar spikes, lows, and other abnormalities that I can address and correct at a later date. I like wearing a cgm because of the accuracy it helps me achieve with my numbers and the information it constantly gives me about my numbers. I dislike my cgm because it adds another thing to my body that can be accidently tugged, pulled, or yanked.

Ashley C. (age 16)
I’ll wear my cgm dexcom randomly for like a month then take a break from it. I don’t like it because it’s just another site you have to wear and change out.  You also have to calibrate it every day so I’d rather just not wear it.

Cameron (age 18)
I wear a Dexcom because it’s nice to be able to see where my numbers are all the time. I like it because it shows when I’m going low/high.

Caroline (age 15)
I wear a Dexcom CGM. I chose to begin wearing a CGM because I became extremely unaware of my hypoglycemia and my doctor recommended getting a CGM in order to prevent having extreme lows. I really like the fact that I can always know my number because I can prick my finger less, and I can determine how to dose based on the situation I am in & what my sugar is at the moment. The only thing I dislike sometimes is the constant, constant reminders when I’m high. It can get annoying.

 Christina (age 15)
No, I don’t wear any type of sensor. I don’t want to wear a sensor at the moment because it is another device that would be attached to me. Also, I have a hard time changing my pump site on time every 3 days, so I can’t imagine having to worry about another site. Lastly, I can be a bit of a worrier and I don’t think having access to my blood sugars trends 24/7 would be good for me; I would constantly obsess over the graph. For me, it’s good to not be so connected to my blood sugars.

Claire (age 18)
I don’t wear one, no.  It’s not that I don’t like them, however I think that they’re better for little kids whose parents want to keep a closer eye on their kid’s numbers. I, on the other, have a good grasp on how I feel in relation to my blood sugar, and just don’t feel they’re necessary for older kids.

Erin (age 17)
I do not wear a cgm but have been interested in one at times. With the new Medtronic pump/CGM I would possibly be interested in getting it however I do remember not liking having a pump site when I was on a pump. I like how it tracks sugars and you can watch trends but do not like having to wear something that’s like a site on me 24/7 and then still checking with a meter.

Haley (age 14)
I am not currently wearing a cgm. I have worn one as a trial for a couple of weeks. But, while I like being able to see how my bg is trending, I don’t like having something attached to me all the time. Also, another downside is it’s another piece of equipment I have to keep up with.

Ian (age 15)
I wear the dexcom for the control and knowledge it gives me. I love the currentness of it, but the transmitter is far too bulky, especially with a belt on.

Jordan (age 18)
I wear the Enlite cgm periodically because it helps me monitor my BG.  I don’t like how much it beeps or alarms.  It annoys me.  It’s difficult to deal with because I can never seem to calibrate it properly, so it isn’t as accurate as it could be. It also always catches on everything. I’m not a fan.

Julia (age 15)
I wear a Dexcom. I wear it to help regulate my sugar to catch highs and lows quicker. I like it because it is very useful but it also can be a pain because it’s another thing attached to me.

Laura (age 17)
I wear the Dexcom. I really enjoy this because it makes it less of a hassle to handle my blood sugar. Not only that, but it makes me more comfortable falling asleep at night knowing that if I go low, an alarm will make me up. The only bad thing about the cgm is that it makes me lazy about testing my blood sugar.

Lexi (age 16)
I would love to but the extra site scares me, especially because I’ve seen what the needle looks like.

Maggie (age 16)
I wear a Dexcom. My mom likes to keep track of my numbers and I think it helps me keep an eye on if I’m going up or down. I think it’s helpful but I don’t like the constant alarming it can get annoying.

McKenna (age 16)
I wear a cgm and it has its ups and downs. Some perks are that I do not have to check my blood sugar as much, it’s usually very accurate, and it helps me keep my A1C in check. Some of the downsides are that sometimes it can be very noticeable, sometimes it can become very itchy or it can hurt when putting it in.

Skylyn (age 16)
I wear an Enlite sensor mainly because my stepmother makes me. I am not a fan of the sensors. She wants me to wear them all the time which I don’t think is necessary. I feel like the sensor would be beneficial before endo appointments so my doctor can have more info to look at but that’s about it. I also test myself like 6 times a day at least and during the night so I don’t see the point of the sensor. They affect what I wear whenever I go out places. They are not very accurate either.